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Traffic jams often come from shock waves that start when someone hits their brakes. The faster the traffic, the bigger the gaps, and the more abrupt the braking. The effect of breaking works its way back down through the traffic, and the many stops have a reinforcing negative effect on the queue, which ultimately causes even more congestion.

A couple of years ago, John Niles and I started writing, blogging, and speaking about getting ready for autonomous vehicles. We called this work, collectively, The End Of Driving in recognition of our certainty that technology would displace the driver just as the automobile had replaced the horse. We’re still... View Article

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Disruptive technology

New technologies will revolutionize mobility as they will challenge and change our concepts of planning, booking, using and paying.
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Mobility & Living

Developments in mobility will affect many areas of our everyday life. How will we live in cities? Will there be further attraction to a country life?
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In an earlier article, we advocated applying some of the principles of packet switching, the backbone technology of internet and telecom, to mobility and transport. After all, the similarity is clear. Packets carry bits, vehicles carry people and goods. In a first of a series of three articles, we'll explore some possibilities. We'll start by analyzing the impact of sharing vehicles.

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Legal framework

Changing circumstances entail changing requirements: To pave the way for new mobility concepts and possibilities a range of legal regulations have to be discussed and adapted.
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Is the Internet of Things (IoT) the Next Big Thing for transportation, or does it mean opening up your car or bus or train to hackers? Can a hacker detune your engine, suddenly reverse the action of your steering wheel, make the airbags deploy when you hit 110 kilometer per hour, reprogram your anti-lock brake system, or just disable the whole vehicle?

Using the bicycle in Latin America to go to work, move around the city and even take the kids to school is becoming very common. On one side weather is mostly favorable, cities are relatively flat, infrastructure integration projects are being developed and the understanding of multiple mobility aspects (mainly cultural) is changing. On the other side, congestion is rising, travel times are increasing and air pollution is reaching higher levels.

Authors

brian.bolam
UK
A farm or home in the countryside
Lluis A. Vidal
Chile
A big city (urban)
john.cleeland
Australia
The suburbs or outskirts of a big city (suburban)
hdia
Australia
A big city (urban)
U.Schneider
Germany
A big city (urban)
David Levinson
USA
A big city (urban)
Moritz Meenen
Switzerland
A big city (urban)
TechDisruptor
USA
A big city (urban)