75% of Americans are afraid of AVs, Ride-hailing is competing with public transit, Tracking riders with Wi-Fi, and the future of your city:

Welcome to Move Forward’s weekly news wrap-up, featuring the mobility stories you don’t want to miss. Today, we are sharing coverage from moovel Lab’s newest project, “Who Wants To Be A Self Driving Car?” Also included is an examination of public transit in rural areas, how rail-hailing services compete with transportation systems, a new WiFi project in London’s tube, and more.

 

75% of Americans are afraid of AV:

Motherboard explains moovel Lab’s “Who Wants To Be A Self-Driving Car?” project as it relates back to human’s trustworthiness and confidence in autonomous technology, specifically citing that 75% of Americans say they would be afraid to travel in an AV.

Motherboard: “Watch Humans Fail at Being Self-Driving Cars” by Samantha Cole, October 13, 2017.

 

shutterstock_397291858

 

The importance of understanding AVs:

A second article on “Who Wants To Be A Self-Driving Car?” explains the importance of understanding the technology behind AVs as they become increasingly introduced to society.

Fast Co Design: “What It’s Like To See The World As A Self-Driving Car” by Katharine Schwab, October 16, 2017.

 

Public transit in rural areas is on the rise:

Smart Cities Dive reports that public transportation ridership in rural areas has increased 7.8% from 2007 to 2015, according to the APTA. Interestingly, ridership is on the rise even though populations in these areas have decreased by more than half a million people.

Smart Cities Dive: “Report: Rural public transit ridership is on the rise” by Kim Slowey, October 13, 2017.

 

shutterstock_439170355

 

Ride-hailing competes with public transit:

A report by researchers at the U.C. Davis Institute of Transportation Studies suggests that ride-hailing apps like Uber and Lyft draw people away from public transit. The report also suggests that these services increase the amount of cars on the road.

The New York Times: “Is Uber Helping or Hurting Mass Transit?” by Emily Badger, October 16, 2017.

 

Tracking riders with WiFi:

Transport for London, the agency that runs and operates London’s massive underground tube system, is utilizing the system’s WiFi to track its riders’ data. The agency says that this data will help to guide and influence future operations, schedules, and investments for the tube.

Slate: “Mind the Wi-Fi” by Henry Grabar, October 16, 2017.

 

Billions spent on AVs:

A new report from the Brookings Institute found that $80 billion was invested into self-driving car technology between 2014 and 2017. The authors note that there is no public tracker for autonomous vehicle spending, so the report is meant to provide insight into what is likely a far larger amount.

Jalopnik: “A Whopping $80 Billion Has Been Invested So Far In The Self-Driving Car Race” by Ryan Felton, October 16, 2017.

 

shutterstock_414233368

 

The future of your city:

Bloomberg reports on various new studies describing how AVs will influence urban planning and construction. Recent reports suggest that parking lots could be converted into apartment buildings, homebuilders will build out further from city centers, and homeowners will own their homes for longer periods of time.

Bloomberg: “Driverless Cars Will Open the Door to a Building Spree” by Patrick Clark, October 17, 2017.

 

Car ownership on a rapid decline:

A new report from RethinkX, a research group that looks at disruptive technologies from a financial, market, and technology perspective, found that by 2030, 95% of all U.S. passenger miles could be served by transport-as-a-service (TaaS) providers. The report further examines the potential impacts from widespread AV adoption– including geopolitical implications, household income, and changes in the automobile industry.

Urbanism Next: “New Report Predicts the Effective End of Individual Car Ownership by 2030” by Nico Larco, October 18, 2017.

 

Please note that this article expresses the opinions of the author and does not reflect the views of Move Forward.

You can be a self-driving car, a car-less future, P3s will rid financial pressures, and data can eliminate traffic deaths

Welcome to Move Forward’s weekly news wrap-up, featuring the mobility stories you don’t want to miss. Today we are sharing coverage from moovel Lab’s newest project, “Who Wants To Be A Self Driving Car?” We’re also sharing speculations of a car-less future, how public private partnerships can help transit agencies with financial pressures, Vision Zero cities that are turning to data to achieve their goals, and more.

 
shutterstock_586488983

You can be a self-driving car:

Auto Evolution covers moovel Lab’s “Who Wants to Be a Self-Driving Car?” project, in particular examining the technology that allows humans to experience the reality of an autonomous vehicle. The article applauds moovel Lab’s motives for creating the vehicular platform, saying, “The actually quite brilliant idea is to ‘use augmented reality to help people empathize with self-driving vehicle systems.’”

Auto Evolution: Daimler-Owned moovel Group Creates a Confusing Human-Driven Autonomous Vehicle by Vlad Mitrache, October 12, 2017.

 

A car-less future:

An opinion piece in Autoblog argues that rather than AVs and other smart mobility options forcing cities to go “car-less,” we will instead see a future of re-imagined mobility which incorporates these technologies into existing infrastructures.

Autoblog: Visions of ‘cities of the future’ get it wrong when it comes to cars by Doug Newcomb, October 9, 2017

 
shutterstock_382991449

Pittsburgh expands mobility options:

For Pittsburgh transit riders, a new partnership with “Healthy Rides” will allow customers with a fare card to utilize unlimited bike share trips of 15 minutes or less. Crucially, this will allow riders to access free and expanded transport options while increasing access to people without credit card accounts.

Streetsblog: In Pittsburgh, Transit Passes Come With Bike-Share Access at No Extra Charge by Angie Schmitt, October 9, 2017.

 

How AVs could help NYC:

Fast Company examines a new report, “New Mobility: Autonomous Vehicles and the Region” which seeks to demonstrate how AVs can improve mobility in New York City. According to the authors, the city’s current problems with traffic and delayed commutes could be mitigated by the strategic adoption of urban mobility technologies and policies that support these infrastructural changes.

Fast Company: How New York Can Use Self-Driving Cars To Improve Mobility, Not Clog Traffic by Eillie Anzilotti, October 9, 2017.

 

P3s will alleviate financial pressures:

A new contribution for The Eno Center for Transportation explores the importance of public-private partnerships in the public transportation sector. The piece argues that, “public agencies must strongly align the private sector’s profit motive with the public sector’s goals in order to unlock this potential using financial incentives in contracts and market competition during the bidding process.”

The Eno Center for Transportation: A Bid for Transit- Improving Service with Contracted Operations by Stephanie Lotshaw, Paul Lewis, David Bragdon, and Zak Accuardi, October 10, 2017.

 
shutterstock_362873855

“Transit nerds” help Boston:

Boston’s MBTA has been utilizing the efforts of a group of engineers and IT experts– called TransitMatters– for transportation advice. TransitMatters uses analytics, logic, and data to provide the MBTA with suggestions for improvement on current projects, advice to improve current transit lines, and more.

Commonwealth Magazine: Shadow transit agency by Bruce Mohl, October 10, 2017.

 

Data can eliminate traffic deaths:

Vision Zero cities– those committed to eliminating traffic fatalities and severe injuries– are turning to data to further understand where crashes happen most often, what conditions correlate with collisions, and which road users are most vulnerable. Additionally, Vision Zero cities are able to build on these data-driven efforts to fill gaps in existing data, which improves the accuracy, scope, and fairness of their efforts to eliminate traffic fatalities.

Government Technology: Can Better Data Make Zero Traffic Deaths a Reality?” by Chris Bousquet, October 11, 2017.

 

Governments need to plan for AVs:

On Tuesday, President Trump told lawmakers that he is abandoning the public-pAs the arrival of autonomous vehicles brings the prospect of improved transportation systems, TechCrunch argues that cities, states, and the Federal Government all need to revise their transportation planning accordingly.

TechCrunch: Now is the time to plan for the autonomous vehicle future by Tom Alberg and Craig Mundie, October 11, 2017.

Please note that this article expresses the opinions of the author and does not reflect the views of Move Forward.

How local agencies can prepare for MaaS disruption

How local agencies can prepare for MaaS disruption, finance executive on the gig economy’s cashless future, a deep dive into P3s, and a trillion dollar idea

Welcome to Move Forward’s weekly news wrap-up, featuring the mobility stories you don’t want to miss. This week we are sharing thoughts on how local agencies can plan for MaaS and the emergence of AVs, an interview with Visa’s head of digital products on the cashless future, infrastructure funding from the White House, and more.

Preparing for MaaS disruption:

With the future holding promise for AVs and changing mobility options, experts say local agencies can manage the Mobility as a Service (MaaS) boom in their cities by investing in infrastructure and funding autonomous research, among others.

State Tech: “How Local Agencies Can Manage the Mobility as a Service Boom” by Phil Goldstein and Juliet Van Wagenen, August 24, 2017.

Finance exec on the gig economy:

Sam Shrauger, head of digital products at Visa, explains how the gig economy is changing the way people pay for goods and services. Shrauger further discusses the possibilities of the financial industry’s cashless and cardless future.

Government Tech: “How the Gig Economy Served as a Catalyst for a Cashless, Cardless Society” by Thomas Lee, August 28, 2017

shutterstock_486809698

Cities must predict impact of AVs:

A piece in Planetizen describes how cities must prepare for the implementation of AVs in the near future. The author cites curbside space allocation for pick-up and drop-off, e-commerce delivery, and micro transit corridors as factors in the future of urban street design and city planning.

Planetizen: “Autonomous Vehicles and Streets: A Guide to Potential Impacts” by N. Larco, July 29, 2017.

Automakers fast adopting mobility services:

With new technologies emerging, many auto companies now believe that the “two cars in every garage” business model will be replaced by customers who instead favor other mobility solutions, like ride-sharing.

The Detroit News: “Carmakers push toward mobility as a service” by Jim Lynch, August 1, 2017.

shutterstock_639904234

P3s on the line:

According to Governing, a judge’s demand for new ridership projections could put a stop to Maryland’s Purple Line project, and potentially undermine future public-private partnerships nationwide.

Governing: “Court Case in Maryland Could Threaten P3s Nationwide” by Daniel C. Vock, August 28, 2017.

Smart city or pocket of pain?:

A new study on ground mobility options identified Columbus, OH – America’s first Smart City – as a “pocket of pain” for intercity ground transportation. The article argues that without proper mobility services, like Amtrak services and express coach lines, Columbus cannot be a smart city.

Smart Cities Dive: “Columbus, OH may be smart — but its transportation options are lacking” by Cody Boteler, August 28, 2017.

P3s explained:

As the United States increasingly turns to public-private partnerships (P3s) to tackle infrastructure projects; Construction Dive explains the 5 elements of a successful P3 implementation.

Construction Dive: “5 elements of a successful P3” by Kim Slowey, August 29, 2017.

President aims to invest $1 trillion in infrastructure:

President Donald Trump’s administration told 150 state and local transportation officials that they plan to use their infrastructure plan to create incentives for the private sector to finance public entities like bridges, tunnels and highways. Throughout the next four years, the Trump Administration is hoping to invest $1 trillion in infrastructure between the government and private sectors.

The New York Times: “White House Wants to Help States, Cities Offload Infrastructure” by Reuters, August 30, 2017.

shutterstock_394392439

Please note that this article expresses the opinions of the author and does not reflect the views of Move Forward.

This Week in the Headlines: July 31st – August 6th, 2017

Welcome to Move Forward’s weekly news wrap-up, featuring the mobility stories you don’t want to miss. This week’s edition features a piece on MobilityX, with commentary from the Director of Innovation Management, Sam Marshall. We’re also including news of transportation funding in the government, the predicted fiscal impact of AVs, the global trend of automakers involvement in mobility services, and more.

MobilityX seeks startups for mobility innovation:

Sam Marshall, Director of Innovation Management at MobilityX, provides commentary on the accelerator’s mission to assist start-ups in creating advanced mobility technology.

Auto Finance News: “Moovel’s Accelerator Seeks Mobility Aggregator Startups” by Emma Sandler, August 3, 2017.

Bipartisan bill to increase transit funding:

The Senate Appropriations Committee has approved the fiscal year 2018 Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Appropriations bill. The bill funds a total of $60.8 billion in spending towards infrastructure and economic development projects, including $19.47 billion to the US DOT alone.

Smart Growth America: “Senate Appropriations Committee Bill Protects Transit, Tiger, and Community Development Programs” by K. Hibbert, July 28, 2017.

shutterstock_573488362

Cities must predict impact of AVs:

A piece in Planetizen describes how cities must prepare for the implementation of AVs in the near future. The author cites curbside space allocation for pick-up and drop-off, e-commerce delivery, and micro transit corridors as factors in the future of urban street design and city planning.

Planetizen: “Autonomous Vehicles and Streets: A Guide to Potential Impacts” by N. Larco, July 29, 2017.

Automakers fast adopting mobility services:

With new technologies emerging, many auto companies now believe that the “two cars in every garage” business model will be replaced by customers who instead favor other mobility solutions, like ride-sharing.

The Detroit News: “Carmakers push toward mobility as a service” by Jim Lynch, August 1, 2017.

“Public transit simulator” forecasts on-demand transit routes:

A new simulator uses city data to estimate how on-demand routes might look for existing transportation networks. According to experts, increasing numbers of transit agencies are interested in implementing on-demand services to compete with the shorter wait-times for ride-hailing apps.

Fast Company: “This New Simulator Helps Cities Test A Future Of On-Demand Transit” by Adele Peters, August 1, 2017.

shutterstock_653575417

The impact of AVs on city revenues:

In 2016, the U.S.’ largest 25 cities collectively netted nearly $5 billion in auto-related revenues, a number which will likely decline as AVs further reduce gasoline tax collections and mitigate government revenues from taxis, car rentals, and other car businesses.

Government Technology: “How Driverless Cars Could Be a Big Problem for Cities” by Mike Maciag, August 1, 2017.

shutterstock_458481748

Self-Driving “Bill 3388” in Congress:

The “Self-Driving Coalition for Safer Streets,” backed by automakers and tech companies, is pushing a bill through Congress that would limit local government’s ability to regulate autonomous vehicles in their cities. If passed, Bill 3388 would allow car manufacturers to test 100,000 self-driving vehicles on public roads.

Streetsblog: “Congress and Auto Industry Move to Ban Cities From Regulating Self-Driving Cars” by Angie Schmitt and Stephen Miller, August 2, 2017.

Please note that this article expresses the opinions of the author and does not reflect the views of Move Forward.

This Week in the Headlines: July 24th – July 30th, 2017

Welcome to Move Forward’s weekly news wrap-up, featuring the mobility stories you don’t want to miss. This week’s edition features coverage of moovel’s Fare Connect technology, along with news around ridesharing’s competition with public transit, how “transit deserts” can effect more than just mobility, how new automotive trends are impacting the future of transportation, and more.

moovel’s Fare Connect benefits riders and agencies:

Following moovel’s presence at UITP 2017, MassTransit Magazine features a story on the new Fare Connect technology, highlighting the benefits of its contactless and hardware agnostic solutions for both riders and transit agencies. The story includes comments from moovel technical project manager Sophia Maletz, who highlights how Fare Connect has been beneficial to OCTA after being rolled out on their fleet of buses.

Mass Transit Magazine: “moovel Introduces Fare Connect a Contactless Fare System” by Maile Bucher, July 25, 2017.

shutterstock_602671940

Ridesharing set to compete with public transit:

As ridesharing services become more widely used, experts say that the next space for growth in this industry is in direct competition with the public transit sector. Bloomberg’s Conor Sen addresses the dilemma and provides insight into how the government should prepare for these pending transportation changes.

Bloomberg: “The Dilemma When Uber or Lyft Outcompetes Public Transit” by Conor Sen, July 20, 2017.

Hyperloop- the pros and cons:

Elon Musk has indicated that his Boring Company gained verbal approval from government officials to begin working on a hyperloop from New York City to Washington, D.C., an initiative meant to cut travel time between the two cities down to just 29 minutes. However, critics say that this technology is not yet proven and is not cost effective.

CityLab: “5 Reasons to Be Wary of Elon Musk’s Hyperloop” by Laura Bliss, July 21, 2017.

shutterstock_631212983

Auto-valet technology makes its debut:

Daimler and Bosch have partnered together to create an automated valet system designed to find a parking spot and park the vehicle autonomously. The two companies debuted this technology in the parking garage for the Mercedes-Benz Museum in Stuttgart, Germany.

TechCrunch: “Daimler and Bosch create a driverless parking garage” by Darrell Etherington, July 24, 2017.

Access to public transit impacts more than just mobility:

Research shows that low-income residents living in “transit deserts,” areas in a city where demand for transit outweighs supply, experience debilitating setbacks. The lack of available transportation options can impede their abilities to keep a job or receive healthcare.

The Conversation: “Stranded in our own communities: Transit deserts make it hard for people to find jobs and stay healthy” by Junfeng Jiao and Nicole McGrath, July 25, 2017.

The new auto trends shaping the future of mobility:

Forbes’ Daniel Newman explores the top six digital transformation trends that are occurring in the automotive industry. Along with autonomous driving, Newman sites digital sources in the car buying process, connected supply chain and improved manufacturing, Mobility as a Service, and data security and protection as the industry’s top trends.

Forbes: “Top 6 Digital Transformation Trends In The Automotive Industry” by Daniel Newman, July 25, 2017.

shutterstock_574611961

Mexico City aims to rebalance urban ecosystem:

Mexico City is purposely limiting the growth of the city’s parking infrastructure, hoping to return some balance to its urban ecosystem. Counter-intuitively, it is believed that large parking lots and garages create more traffic, make housing less affordable, and make city streets more difficult to navigate.

Wired: “Mexico City is Killing Parking Spaces. Pay attention America” by Aarian Marshall, July 25, 2017

Please note that this article expresses the opinions of the author and does not reflect the views of Move Forward.